satis egitimisatis egitimitengda.pro

Open@Blog

Discussion on the state of cloud computing and open source software that helps build, manage, and deliver everything-as-a-service.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that has been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
Lars Kurth

Lars Kurth

Lars Kurth had his first contact with the open source community in 1997 when he worked on various parts of the ARM toolchain. This experience led Lars to become a passionate open source enthusiast who worked with and for many open source communities over the past 15 years. Lars contributed to projects such as GCC, Eclipse, Symbian and Xen and became the open source community manager for the Xen Project in 2011 and later the chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board. Lars is an IT generalist with a wide range of skills in software development and methodology. He is experienced in leading and building engineering teams and communities, as well as constructing marketing, product management, and change programs impacting 1000s of users. He has 17 years of industry experience in the infrastructure, tools and mobile sectors working at ARM, Citrix, Nokia and the Symbian Foundation.

Event Report: Xen Project Developer Summit 2015

Posted by on in Events

This year's Xen Project Developer Summit is over! We had two days packed with highly technical sessions that were attended by 120 delegates. Our sessions have - as always - been very interactive with lots of discussions during and after the talks. Of course we did also have lots of time for in-corridor conversations during breaks, which most of us look forward to every year. XPDS15
Andrew Cooper from Citrix is giving an introduction of Migration v2 in Xen 4.6. Check out the PDF and video

Session Recordings and Slides

Most of the slides are already available as PDFs on the event website. We will re-post the slides later on our slideshare channel and on the Xen Project Website. Video recordings of the conference sessions are already posted on our youtube channel and will also be posted on the Xen Project Website. Check out some of my personal highlights:

Security: xSplice - Live Patching the Xen Hypervisor

by Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk, Oracle

Other security, robustness and QoS related talks that are worth checking out are

User Stories: Virtualizing the Locomotive: Ready, Set, Go!

by Mark Kraeling, GE Transportation
A great Xen and Virtualization user story showing how Xen and Virtualization is used in extreme circumstances.

...
Hits: 463
Rate this blog entry:
0
Continue reading Comments

Only last week, the Xen Project team was at OSCON where we launched Mirage OS 2.0 (event report to follow soon, but in the meantime check out the following sessions Nymote and Mirage, Floss Weekly on Mirage OS and Community War Stories) and now our Developer Summit is just round the corner. As we have seen tremendous community growth in the last 12 months (>30%) and the most feature reach Xen Project Hypervisor release coming up soon, I thought I'd share what you can expect.

xpds14
(click image to go to event website)

What to expect?

Xen Project Developer Summits are packed with highly technical content where the core developers of the Xen Project community come together to discuss the evolution of the Xen Project. The conference is a mixture of talks and interactive sessions in un-conference format (which we call BoFs). Newcomers and those who are interested in the progress and future of the Xen Project, it's sub projects (Hypervisor on ARM and x86, Upstreams and Downstreams, Embedded and Automotive variants, Cloud Operating Systems such as Mirage OS) usually will get tremendous value from attending the event. Besides roadmap, feature updates and developer topics, this year features a few themes:

  • Network Function Virtualization
  • Security
  • Performance and Scalability
  • Cloud Operating Systems
  • Topics that are important for automotive/embedded/mobile use-cases, such as Real-time virtualization, certification and ARM support

Why not check out the agenda or watch last year's sessions to get a sense of what is coming. Note that BoF's and discussion groups will be published next week.

How to get the most out of the Summit?

Our developer events are designed to help you make connections and to participate. A good way to network are our evening social event and to network during the breaks. Another great way to get the most out of the summit is to submit a BoF/discussion groups about a topic you care about or to participate in a BoF/discussion group. BoF submissions are open until August 11 and the BoF schedule will be published the week before the event. Most of our talks will have an extensive and interactive Q&A portion, which is another way to engage.

...
Hits: 5119
Rate this blog entry:
0
Continue reading Comments

How fast is Xen on ARM?

Posted by on in Cloud News

This is a repost of Stefano Stabellini's blog post on blog.xenproject.org

With Xen on ARM getting out of the early preview phase and becoming more mature, it is time to run a few benchmarks to check that the design choices paid out, the architecture is sound and the code base is solid. It is time to find out how much is the overhead introduced by Xen on ARM and how it compares with Xen and other hypervisors on x86.

I measured the overhead by running the same benchmark on a virtual machine on Xen on ARM and on native Linux on the same hardware. It takes a bit longer to complete the benchmark inside a VM, but how much longer? The answer to this question is the virtualization overhead.

Setup

I chose AppliedMicro X-Gene as the ARM platform to run the benchmarks on: it is an ARMv8 64-bit SoC with an 8 cores cpu and 16GB of RAM. I had Dom0 running with 8 vcpus and 1GB of RAM, the virtual machine that ran the tests had 2GB of RAM and 8 vcpus. To make sure that the results are comparable I restricted the amount of memory available to the native Linux run, so that Linux had all the 8 physical cores at its disposal but only 2GB of RAM.

For the x86 tests, I used a Dell server with an Intel Xeon x5650, that is a 6 cores HyperThreading cpu. HyperThreading was disabled during the tests for better performances. Similarly to the ARM tests, I had Dom0 running with 6 vcpus and 1GB of RAM and the virtual machine running with 2GB of RAM and 6 vcpus. The native Linux run had 6 physical cores and 2GB of RAM. For the KVM tests I booted the host with 3GB of RAM, then assigned 2GB of RAM to the KVM virtual machine.

...
Hits: 11271
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

With the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.4 having been released a few weeks ago, the project is starting the planning cycle for version 4.5 of the Hypervisor. So I thought it is worth walking you through how we manage releases.

Welcoming Oracle's Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk as Release Manager

But first I wanted to thank George Dunlap from Citrix for successfully managing the 4.3 and 4.4 releases of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Release Manager role is a volunteer role open to Xen Project maintainers. George, has stepped down from his role recently to find more time for coding and help bootstrap the CentOS virtualization SIG.

Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk has volunteered to take on the role for the 4.5 release. A big welcome and Thank You!

Konrad is Software Development Manager at Oracle. His group's mission is to make Linux and Xen Project virtualization better and faster. As part of this work Konrad has been the maintainer of the Xen Project subsystem in Linux, Xen Project maintainer and now also Release Manager for the 4.5 release of the Xen Project Hypervisor. Konrad has been active in the Linux and Xen communities for more than 6 years and was instrumental in adding Xen Project support to the Linux Kernel.

How The Xen Project manages releases

As is the case for many open source projects, the Xen Project community does not maintain a committed roadmap as proprietary software vendors do. Instead, we strive to accurately track development for new releases, with a predictable release cadence for major releases and maintenance releases. We aim to release the Xen Project Hypervisor every 6-7 months: historically our release cadences ranged from 9 to 18 months. Introducing the Release Manager role was instrumental to getting us to shorter and a predictable release cadence.

...
Hits: 10714
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

I am pleased to announce the next Xen Project Hackathon. The Hackathon will be hosted by Rackspace in their London offices, May 29 and 30. I wanted to thank Paul Voccio and Gus Maskowitz from Rackspace for hosting the Hackathon. I also wanted to thank Rackspace for hosting the Xen Project wiki, mailing lists, blog and other services. This is in line with Rackspace’s vision of openness and helping people:

At Rackspace we build and live openness as much as possible and go out of our way to support and nurture open source where we can. We help people achieve success by solving their hybrid hosting and cloud problems. In that same line we are proud to help the Xen Project run a successful Hackathon in London 2014. Rackspace

What to expect at a Xen Project Hackathon?

The aim of the Hackathon is to give developers the opportunity to meet face to face, to discuss development, coordinate, write code and collaborate with other developers. Of course the event will allow everyone to meet in person and build relationships: to facilitate this, we will have a social event on the evening of the 29th. We will cover many hot topics such as the latest Xen Project Hypervisor 4.4 features, planning for the next Xen Project Hypervisor release, Cloud Integration, Cloud Operating Systems, Mirage OS, Xen Project in emerging segments such as embedded, mobile, automotive and NFV. But at the end of the day, the community will chose the topics that are covered.

To ensure that the event runs efficiently, we are following the following process: Each day is divided into several segments. We will have a number of work areas that are labelled with numbers (or other unique identifiers). Each morning starts with a plenary and scheduling session. Every attendee who cares about a topic can announce a topic, which we will map against a work area and time-slot. This makes it easy for other attendees to participate in projects and discussions they care about. Of course we also encourage attendees to highlight projects they plan to share before the event by adding them to our wiki.

We will wrap up each day with another short plenary session: the aim of this session is to summarize what was done, show brief demos and make improvements to the process.

...
Hits: 41305
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

Open@Citrix

Citrix supports the open source community via developer support and evangelism. We have a number of developers and evangelists that participate actively in the open source community in Apache Cloudstack, OpenStack, OpenDaylight, Xen Project and XenServer. We also conduct educational activities via the Build A Cloud events held all over the world.

Connect