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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in sphinx

Migration from Publican to Sphinx and Read The Docs

When we started with Cloudstack we chose to use publican for our documentation. I don't actually know why, except that Red Hat documentation is entirely based on publican. Perhaps David Nalley's background with Fedora influenced us :) In any case publican is a very nice documentation building system, it is based on the docbook format and has great support for localization. However it can become difficult to read and organize lots of content, and builds may break for strange reasons. We also noticed that we were not getting many contributors to the documentation, in contrast, the translation efforts via transifex has had over 80 contributors. As more features got added to CloudStack the quality of the content also started to suffer and we also faced issues with publishing the translated documents. We needed to do something, mainly making it easier to contribute to our documentation. Enters ReStructured Text (RST) and Read The Docs (RTD).

Choosing a new format

We started thinking about how to make our documentation easier to contribute to. Looking at Docbook, purely xml based, it is a powerful format but not very developer friendly. A lot of us are happy with basic text editor, with some old farts like me mainly stuck with vi. Markdown has certainly helped a lot of folks in writing documentation and READMEs, just look at Github projects. I started writing in Markdown and my production in terms of documentation and tutorials skyrocketed, it is just a great way to write docs. Restructured Text is another alternative, not really markdown, but pretty close. I got familiar with RST in the Apache libcloud project and fell in love with it, or at least liked it way more than docbook. RST is basically text, only a few markups to learn and your off.

Publishing Platform

A new format is one thing but you then need to build documentation in multiple formats: html, pdf, epub potentially more. How do you move from .rst to these formats for your projects ? Comes in Sphinx, pretty much an equivalent to publican originally aimed at Python documentation but now aimed at much more. Installing sphinx is easy, for instance on Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install python-sphinx

You will then have the sphinx-quickstart command in your path, use it to create your sphinx project, add content in index.rst and build the docs with make html. Below is a basic example for a ff sample project.


 
 
 

What really got me sold on reStructuredText and Sphinx was ReadTheDocs (RTD). It hosts documentation for open source projects. It automatically pulls your documentation from your revision control system and builds the docs. The killer feature for me was the integration with github (not just git). Using hooks, RTD can trigger builds on every commit and it also displays an edit on github icon on each documentation page. Click on this icon, and the docs repository will get forked automatically on your github account. This means that people can edit the docs straight up in the github UI and submit pull requests as they read the docs and find issues.

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Open@Citrix

Citrix supports the open source community via developer support and evangeslism. We have a number of developers and evangelists that participate actively in the open source community in Apache Cloudstack, OpenDaylight, Xen Project and XenServer. We also conduct educational activities via the Build A Cloud events held all over the world. 

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