satis egitimisatis egitimitengda.pro

Open@Blog

Discussion on the state of cloud computing and open source software that helps build, manage, and deliver everything-as-a-service.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that has been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Xenserver

If you use the Xen Project Hypervisor, you have a rare opportunity to share what you've learned with your peers.  On September 15, 2014 in New York City, we will be holding our second annual Xen Project User Summit -- and we want you to join us there!

We are looking for talk proposals which will be of interest to other Xen Project users.  Subjects of interest include (but are not limited to):

  • How you use our project’s software in your datacenter or lab
  • How you integrate the Xen Project hypervisor in your solution or cloud
  • How you control the software with custom scripts or utilities
  • Why you chose Xen Project software instead of some other hypervisor
  • How much you time or money you saved by using our software
  • Where you’d like to see our project go in the future

Also, we’d welcome talks about:

  • Features of recent releases and how you use them
  • New projects building on Xen Project software which could open new avenues for end users (like the work around GPU virtualization, cloud operating systems like MirageOS, and additional architectures like ARM)
  • Instructive HowTo sessions to educate attendees about implementing particular capabilities within the software
  • The use of related products and projects (like XenServer, Xen Orchestra, CloudStack, etc.) to make our software even more powerful in the datacenter

 

Hits: 7945
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

Quite a few years ago I made a rather nice living coding things up. Some were big projects used in regulated industries, and others a bit more mundane, but in all cases I tried to ensure confusion over what the point of the project was could be minimized. After all, the last thing I wanted was a prospective user or partner investing in something which wouldn't meet their needs.

Fast-forward to today, and as the XenServer evangelist I want to accomplish the same task, but scope is a bit broader. I want people to be using XenServer, and I want many tens of thousands of them doing so. By the same token, I also want those same users to know they are using XenServer, and not something else. After all, its equally bad if someone thinks they're using XenServer when they aren't, or are using something different when they are in fact using XenServer.

A perfect case in point is the confusion over what "Xen" and "XenServer" are. For years I've heard people who want XenServer referring to it as "Xen" and occasionally as "Xen Server". While many of those people aren't technical, and for them the distinction is largely irrelevant, the fact of the matter is the distinction does matter. For example, if someone is working on a project which they wish to integrate with XenServer, it does them no good to see references to "Xen" all over XenServer content, or to look at examples which reference "Xen"; even if the actual code is for XenServer and not "Xen". Even more significant is that, with the move of the "Xen" hypervisor to the Linux Foundation last year, what was once known as the "Xen" hypervisor has now become the Xen Project hypervisor.

All of which gets me to Apache CloudStack. Apache CloudStack is a wonderful solution for anyone looking to get a cloud up and running quickly, particularly those looking to have multiple hypervisors in their cloud and managed from a single console. Unfortunately, Apache CloudStack is also a perfect example of the problem I'm highlighting here. Within the UI, documentation and code, the term "Xen" and "XenServer" are used interchangeably, when in reality Apache CloudStack only supports XenServer; or more precisely XAPI based toolstacks for the Xen Project hypervisor. To resolve this problem, and to pave the way for the Xen Project hypervisor to become a full citizen of Apache CloudStack, I put forth a proposal to distinguish and disambiguate "Xen" and "XenServer". The design document can be found on the CloudStack wiki. To give an example of the cost of resolving these things after the fact; the initial patch consisted of over 17,000 lines, subsequent patches will be needed following extensive testing, all with the result of no new functionality. If you're interested in following the progress of this activity, please do so on the CloudStack mailing lists, and on the wiki.

The point I hope I'm making here is that when there is the potential for confusion, someone will eventually become confused. If you are working on something which references "Xen" or "XenServer", I hope you'll take a few minutes to see if you're using the right references and if not plan on clarifying things for your customers and users. To assist, please refer to this handy-dandy list:

  • "Xen" is a bare metal hypervisor which since April 2013 is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project and has been renamed as the "Xen Project hypervisor". You can find more information about Xen Project at http://xenproject.org. Importantly, while "Xen" was the name Citrix used for the hypervisor, when "Xen" moved to the Linux Foundation, Citrix granted the Linux Foundation the limited rights to use the word "Xen" as part of the "Xen Project".
  • Citrix continues to use the "Xen" mark in connection with a variety of products such as XenApp and XenDesktop, so if you are working on a project with integration into other Citrix products, and are referring to them as "Xen", you risk further confusion with the hypervisor work occurring with both XenServer and the Xen Project.
  • XAPI, or XenAPI, is a toolstack for use with the Xen Project hypervisor and is a sub-project under Xen Project at the Linux Foundation. You can find more information about XAPI at http://xenproject.org/developers/teams/xapi.html
  • XenServer is a packaged virtualization solution from Citrix which in June 2013 was made completely open source. XenServer uses the Xen Project hypervisor and API support is provided via XAPI. Commercial support for XenServer is available from Citrix, and open source activities can be found on xenserver.org.
  • XCP, or Xen Cloud Platform, was a previous attempt at making XenServer open-source. With XenServer becoming open source in June of 2013, XCP development transitioned to XenServer.       
Hits: 11475
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

You may have heard the new buzz word “Cloud Operating System” in the last few months. The term gained prominence when Cloudius Systems launched OSv at LinuxCon in September. Many people working on OSv - namely Glauber Costa, Pekka Enberg, Avi Kivity and Christoph Hellwig - are well known in the Linux community, due to their role in creating KVM. But the concept of a cloud operating system isn’t new. There are many cloud OSes from which to choose, including the Xen Project's Mirage OS, which had its first release a few weeks ago.

Cloud Operating Systems: A New Incarnation of an Older Idea

The approach taken by OSv (as well as others before OSv), revisits an old approach to operating system construction - the Library OS - and puts it in the context of cloud computing within a virtual machine. The basic premise of this approach is to simplify the application stack in the cloud significantly, removing layers of abstraction and offering the promise of less complexity, increased system security and simplified management of application stacks in the cloud.

b2ap3_thumbnail_CloudOSDiagram.png
Figure 1: on the left, you see a typical application stack run in the cloud today. Of course this is a simplification (leaving out AWS or other cloud APIs). On the right you see. that Cloud Operating systems such as OSv remove the Operating System and replace it with a Language Runtime that is designed to cooperate with the virtual environment the Hypervisor provides (which may include access to Hypervisor APIs).

As you can see, Cloud Operating Systems are designed to run a single application within a single Virtual Machine: thus much of the functionality in a general purpose operating system is simply removed. In other words, you strip out everything that your language and APIs do not need and let the hypervisor take care of it: what you end up with a lean language specific software stack that runs much faster than a normal VM, and is more secure simply because there is less code that could be attacked.

Examples of Cloud Operating Systems

As stated earlier, OSv is not the first Cloud Operating System on the market. To the credit of OSv’s creators, it did put the technology on the map by creating lots of buzz.

Cloud OS

...
Hits: 25791
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

XCP support coming to CloudStack in the next release

Posted by on in Open Source

XCP has, in a very short time, become one of the preferred hypervisors in the CloudStack community, and for good reason. XCP has a number of features that eclipse even some of the paid editions of XenServer, and all with no annual need to reacquire even the free license code.

The XCP project recently announced the release of version 1.1, which has continued to generate a lot of interest and questions about when CloudStack will support it.  To keep pace with the rapid development cycle of XCP, CloudStack recently merged in code to support XCP 1.1 and that should appear in the next release of CloudStack. Of course, if you want to play with it today, you can always build from source.

The potential for XCP (and the sister Project Kronos which releases XAPI, or the Xen API, as a package that can be included in Linux Distributions) is exciting, and I hope to see XCP and Project Kronos drive a lot of the innovation around Xen and open source virtualization in the coming months. 

Hits: 155657
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

Cloudstack 2.2.8 Now Available!

Posted by on in CloudStack Tips

CloudStack 2.2.8 is now available the latest version can be found on the CloudStack Download page. Version 2.2.8 includes the following new features (numbers are links to the feature requests in Bugszilla). 

  • 3224 - Multiple NFS servers may be used to provide secondary storage for a zone
  • 4942 - Networking metering may be performed on direct networks. This is in conjunction with InMon Traffic Sentinel and sFlow/NetFlow enabled switches.
  • 6451 - XenServer host passwords may be changed using the CloudStack API.
  • 6873 - Clusters, Pods and Zones may be put into a maintenance mode. In this mode no new VM allocations will be made to them. Administrators can still create VMs on this hardware.
  • 7507 - KVM now supports local disk for primary storage.
  • 7553The virtual router is now sized according to a system VM service offering. This allows for increasing virtual hardware available to some users' routers.
  • 8115 -  Source IP filtering is now available in the virtual router.
  • 8350 - The software load balancer in the virtual router has been tuned for performance.
  • 8830 - The parent template ID is provided for templates created from snapshot. This allows for template usage tracking.
  • 8901 The CloudStack UI will give indication that a snapshot is in progress.

Full releae notes can be found here (PDF download). 

Hits: 8102
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading Comments

Open@Citrix

Citrix supports the open source community via developer support and evangeslism. We have a number of developers and evangelists that participate actively in the open source community in Apache Cloudstack, OpenDaylight, Xen Project and XenServer. We also conduct educational activities via the Build A Cloud events held all over the world. 

Connect